IMG_3367

Minnesota – Goodbye Truck Camper

After having crossed South Dakota from West to East we had finally reached Minnesota, the second to last state we would visit during our journey. We had already made plans to go to Minneapolis to visit a German-American family we knew and try to sell our camper in the area but first we needed some time to do the last minor repairs and cosmetic fixes. We had tried to find a spot where we could spend a week or so for free. Not only our time but also our money was starting to run out and we didn’t know if we’d be successful with selling car and camper. It wasn’t easy to find a place since we wanted it to be a bit nice and somewhere outside urban areas, but at the same time we needed to have some city nearby where we could buy supplies and groceries and access the internet. In addition to that it shouldn’t be too far away from the Minneapolis metropolitan area in case somebody would find the sales ad for our camper online and wanted to see it. Even with our high expectations we had found two promising candidates and checked out the first one at Clear Lake. It was a beautiful place and almost empty so we picked a spot right at the lakeshore. The only thing we had to do to be able to stay there was calling the Sheriff’s office and tell them that we were there. We stayed for two nights and despite the fact that it was very hot and humid we liked it. During the second night there was heavy thunderstorm and when we crawled out of our camper the next morning our camping table had disappeared. Maybe it had been blown right into the lake by the wind or somebody stole it.

There's barbecue grills to be found in almost every park and camping spot in the USA.
There’s barbecue grills to be found in almost every park and camping spot in the USA.

While studying our Minnesota map we had noticed that there were a lot of places that had german names. For instance there was a city called “Cannon Stadt” and even a “Cologne”. We had learned that a lot of Germans had emigrated to the United States over the course of several centuries and in many places and many ways that german heritage was still apparent. We also came through New Ulm, which is a very German town with more than half of it’s inhabitants having german origins. They have a “Glockenspiel”, their own smaller version of the “Hermanns-Denkmal” and a banner above the downtown mall said “Willkommen”. We had gone there to use the internet but suddenly our car started to make trouble. The engine didn’t run smooth anymore and the check engine light on the dashboard started to blink. Just what we needed after six months without any trouble and shortly before we wanted to sell the car! We drove to a garage and were informed that it was probably a problem with the spark plugs and that they all had to be replaced which would cost somewhere around 400 $. We were a bit shocked and told the guy that we had to think about it since that amount just wasn’t in our budget anymore. Since I’m naturally suspicious about car repair people and had many bad experiences in the past we started to look for other repair places. The first two said they wouldn’t be able to look at our car in the next few days but at the third place a young mechanic hooked up his diagnostics device right away, replaced one spark plug and 20 minutes and 40 bucks later the engine was purring like a cat again. We were very happy about that and celebrated the fact by visiting New Ulm’s German Store where we bought some German cookies, soup, custard and chocolate that were on sale.

Before
Before
After
After

Our free camping spot at the lake was too far away from Minneapolis so we proceeded to our second option, the High Island Creek Park near the charming, small historic town of Henderson. We arrived there shortly before the Labor Day weekend. When the weekend came the place filled up to the last spot with people bringing their horses along with them. It was still very hot and very humid and all the horse droppings lent the place a certain “aroma”. We stayed anyway and started to fix the last things on our camper. After the long weekend had passed all the people disappeared again and we were all alone there once more. One day we drove through Henderson and were surprised to see the streets full of people and nice old cars. They had one of their regular classic car events going on and we strolled around and enjoyed looking at lovingly restored American cars from the last 100 years or so. Still, the most memorable and charming experience we had in Henderson was when we went into the local liquor store to stock up on some booze for our barbecue evening. While we strolled through the aisles I heard a strange sound from behind a door and jokingly said to the shop owner “It sounds like you’re keeping a baby goat back there!” to which she replied “I do! Wanna see it?”. Of course we wanted and the little guy proved to be absolutely adorable. We learned that her owner was intending to start a side business with making goat’s cheese and the baby goat was to become the test balloon.

The cute baby goat in the liquor store.
The cute baby goat in the liquor store.
The Henderson Classic Car Roll In.
The Henderson Classic Car Roll In.
Probably the oldest car on display.
Probably the oldest car on display.

Finally it was time to move on to Minneapolis, or rather Edina which lies at the outskirts of it. There we had been invited to visit Anne, Carla and Wieland. When Janina had still been in school they had been so kind to let her live with them for half a year. Once more they showed their hospitality by taking us in for two weeks while we wanted to try and sell our truck and camper. I had only met Wieland one time in Germany and didn’t know his wife Anne and their daughter Carla yet. Their other two daughters had already moved out and live in New York and Amsterdam now. We were welcomed very warmly and all had dinner together. We even got our own room and started to fill it up right away with all the stuff we had accumulated in our camper over the course of six months. We instantly felt at home due to our very amiable, generous and kind hosts and we all seemed to enjoy each other’s company right from the start. Wieland and Anne went to great lengths to show us as much of the area as possible and to make us feel comfortable.

High Island Creek Park near Henderson during the Labor Day weekend.
High Island Creek Park near Henderson during the Labor Day weekend.

Our time in Edina was quite busy since we still had to do some last things on our camper, update our blog and try to get the truck camper sold. Also Anne and Wieland took us out for dinner several times, showed us the bustling Global Market in Minneapolis and took us to see a Renaissance Fair one Sunday. I had visited the german equivalents to that event a lot of times back in Germany where those kind of fairs where always about being very authentic medieval. An American Renaissance fair is quite a different thing to that. It’s not only about medieval times and furthermore not only about “real” history as well. You get to see visitor dressed up as elves and fairies with stuffed pet dragons on their shoulder and fairy-wings on their back. Also you can ride on camels and elephants and stroll from booth to booth which sometimes looked a bit like they were taken from an amusement park. Wieland had opted to wear his Lederhosen at that day since nobody there would bat an eye about that I guess. Since they also have a dog, a little Boston terrier, getting into the fair took a bit of an effort. The dog had to be photographed, forms had to be filled out, an entrance fee had to be paid that was even higher than the one for the human visitors and I think they even had to produce some chitty from their veterinarian. Still it was worth it since there was so much to see and do and we had a great day. The only thing I had to shake my head at was when I wasn’t allowed to buy a beer since I hadn’t brought my passport with the American visa in it. Well, I just hope that means that I still look younger than 21.

An American Renaissance Fair.
An American Renaissance fair.
Renaissance fair visitor.
Renaissance fair visitor.

When we had arrived in Edina we were already starting to get a bit nervous since a lot less people were interested in buying our truck camper than we had anticipated. The season was almost at an end and we didn’t really know what to do. We contacted all the RV dealerships but nobody wanted to buy our beloved truck and camper. Even when we lowered the price significantly it didn’t seem to help. Wieland came up with an option where we would have been able to park our camper at a used car lot and have somebody else sell it for us for a commission. We were glad to have that at least but still considered it to be a worst case scenario. We wanted to spend a few days in New York before we had to fly back home to Germany and needed money for that. Also we had counted on being able to bring a few thousand bucks back home to tide us over until I would get my first salary. Things were looking grim and when we washed the car and also cleaned the engine suddenly it started to act up again. The same problem we thought we had gotten rid of in New Ulm came back and was even worse then. So we had to take the car to a garage another time and have it checked. Moisture had gotten into the spark plugs again and they were able to fix it but it had taken another 200 $ out of our meager reserves.

Wieland and Anne tried to take our mind of the car troubles and wanted to take us on a weekend camping trip to Lake Superior with their new trailer. Wieland had already given us a tour through the company he works for and he had also told his boss Marty about us and our journey. Marty seemed to like what we were doing and had invited us to come visit him in Mora. He also had a huge property and said he might be able to take our truck camper in and show it to potential buyers if we wouldn’t be able to get it sold before we had to leave Minnesota. The plan was that Janina and I would drive to Mora with our camper and Wieland, Anne and Carla would come there later that day with the trailer to pick us up. We would leave our truck there over the weekend and pick it up again on the way back. So we drove to Mora and met Marty who was curious about our travels and what we had seen and experienced in Latina America. We also met one of his sons and his charming girlfriend who were in the process of building up a small organic farm which we found very interesting to see. Time flew by and still no sign or word from Wieland, Anne and Carla. When they finally turned up some time in the afternoon we learned that the car that was pulling the trailer had started to make the same trouble like our car had. Apparently our car problems had been contagious or more probably it was due to the fact that the exact same engine model had been installed in both cars. We had to make a change of plans and spend the night at Marty’s place while Wieland took the car to a garage in Mora. Since we were there anyway and there was some work to do we lent a hand with clearing out and sweeping the big barn on Marty’s property where a fund-raiser for the Democratic Party was planned to happen the following evening. In return Marty showed Janina and me how to use an Atlatl in his orchard. I knew the device from studying archaeology but had never used one. Basically it is a piece of wood that enables you to throw a spear further and with more force than by throwing it by hand. It’s a very old hunting weapon that had already been around during Stone Age times. We were surprised to learn that there even is some kind of American Atlatl association of which Marty is a member. We had great fun trying it out and were a bit proud when Marty declared us to be naturals at it.

Waterfall near Lake Superior as seen from "Wieland's Bridge".
Waterfall near Lake Superior as seen from “Wieland’s Bridge”.

The next morning Wieland fetched the car from the garage and we proceeded to drive to the Big Lake campround near Duluth but during the drive it became apparent that the car still wasn’t ok. Poor Wieland had to take it to another repair place and the next day it finally seemed to be ok. He seemed a bit crestfallen that we were experiencing so many problems during the trip since that hadn’t been all yet. The dog suddenly got a bit sick and started to walk with a limp and the water-pump at the campground broke. Still we kept our good spirits, had a barbecue and later had a lot of fun sitting at the campfire while watching and listening to the group of self-proclaimed water pump experts trying to fix the problem at night. The following day we went to see huge Lake Superior and Shovel Point and had some nice mexican food in Duluth. When we got back to Edina we were looking forward to some people coming by to have a look at our truck camper. Before we had left for Lake Superior we had reduced the price once more and finally had received some calls from people interested in our camper. Unfortunately none of them wanted to buy it and we were back where we had been before. Time was running out and we were starting to become desperate so we reduced the price even more and contacted more dealerships but to no avail. When Janina and I drove to see the nice little town of Stillwater we got another few calls about the camper and a guy named Tom said he’d come by the next day to have a look at it. The catch was that he didn’t have as much money as we were asking for it as he told us right away so we had to think about it. Since we didn’t have any other options anyway and preferred to sell it to a private party rather than some RV dealer, we said that it was ok and he should just come over and see if he liked it. The next day came, Tom and his wife showed up and inspected our truck camper, took a short test drive and then bought it right there on the spot. We took a last picture in front of our Truck Camper and were a bit shocked that half an hour later our beloved home of the last six months was suddenly driving away from us as we stood there watching it go with tears in our eyes. The only souvenir we have from it is our licence plate which Tom agreed to send via mail as soon as he had registered the car. It’s hanging on our living room wall now. Tom and his wife are retired and told us that they want to use the camper to go prospecting. We hope they’re as happy with it as we were and that they find the mother lode somewhere!

Anne, Carla, Wieland, Janina and Martin at Lake Superior.
Anne, Carla, Wieland, Janina and Martin at Lake Superior.

We sold the camper only two days before we had to leave Minnesota and hop on the plane to New York and considered ourselves lucky that it had worked out in the end. We spent the last day with getting a haircut, cleaning our room out and tidying up and of course packing our bags. Surprisingly we managed to fit almost everything in one big backpack, two small ones and one suitcase. We also cooked a german dinner for our fantastic hosts to say thanks for sheltering us. All three of them are such likeable and funny people and I grew very fond of them even in the relatively short time we spent with them. Finally it was time to say goodbye and take the plane to the last destination of our one-year journey and the city I had always wanted to see since I was little – New York. For some reason we managed not to take any pictures in Minneapolis itself. I think we might have been a bit preoccupied with the whole camper sale situation. Minneapolis is a very nice and green city though and I guess you’ll just have to take our word for it.

At the shore of Lake Superior.
At the shore of Lake Superior.

 

German version – deutsche Version

Wir hatten South Dakota von West nach Ost durchquert und schließlich Minnesota erreicht, den vorletzten Staat, den wir während unserer Reise besuchen würden. Es war bereits länger geplant, dass wir nach Minneapolis fahren würden, um dort eine Deutsch-Amerikanische Familie zu besuchen, die wir kannten. Dort wollten wir auch unseren Truck Camper verkaufen, aber zunächst brauchten wir noch etwas Zeit, um die letzten kleinen Makel zu beheben und Schönheitsreparaturen durchzuführen. Wir hatten versucht einen Ort zu finden, an dem wir eine knappe Woche umsonst stehen konnten. Nicht nur die Zeit, sondern auch das Geld begann langsam knapp für uns zu werden und wir wussten nicht ob unser Versuch Auto und Camper zu verkaufen von Erfolg gekrönt sein würde. Es war gar nicht so leicht einen geeigneten Platz zu finden, denn natürlich sollte es dort auch etwas schön sein und idealerweise etwas abseits von Städten liegen, aber gleichzeitig brauchten wir wiederum irgendeine Ansiedlung in der Nähe, wo wir einkaufen und ins Internet gehen konnten. Außerdem durfte es nicht zu weit vom Großraum Minneapolis entfernt liegen, falls jemand über unsere Verkaufsanzeige stolpern sollte und den Camper vielleicht ansehen wollte. Selbst mit unseren hohen Ansprüchen gelang es uns aber zwei mögliche Optionen aufzustöbern und so probierten wir zunächst die erste am Clear Lake aus. Es war ein wirklich schönes Fleckchen und beinahe völlig leer, so dass wir uns einen Stellplatz direkt am Seeufer aussuchen konnten. Das Einzige, das wir tun mussten, um dort bleiben zu dürfen war das Sheriffs-Büro anzurufen und dort mitzuteilen, dass wir da sind. Wir blieben für zwei Nächte und obwohl es sehr heiß und schwül war, fühlten wir uns dort recht wohl. In der zweiten Nacht gab es aber ein heftiges Unwetter und als wir am nächsten Morgen aus unserem Camper krochen war unser Camping-Tisch verschwunden. Vielleicht hatte der Wind ihn in den See gepustet, oder er war einfach geklaut worden.

Während wir unsere Minnesota-Karte studierten, fiel uns auf, dass es anscheinend eine ganze Menge Orte mit deutschen Namen gab. Zum Beispiel fanden wir eine Stadt namens „Cannon Stadt“ und sogar ein „Cologne“ (englisch für „Köln“). Wir hatten bereits erfahren, dass eine ganze Menge Deutscher im Laufe mehrerer Jahrhunderte in die USA ausgewandert waren und an vielen Orten und auf viele Arten konnte man dieses deutsche Erbe immer noch erkennen. Wir kamen auch durch „Neu Ulm“, das eine sehr deutsche Stadt ist, wo über die Hälfte der Einwohner deutsche Wurzeln haben. Es gibt dort ein „Glockenspiel“, eine kleinere Version des Hermanns-Denkmals und ein Spruchband über dem Eingang des Einkaufszentrums in der Innenstadt hieß uns „Willkommen“. Wir waren dort hingefahren um wieder einmal ins Internet zu gehen, als plötzlich unser Auto anfing herumzuspinnen. Der Motor wollte nicht mehr rund laufen und das Motor-Warnlicht auf dem Armaturenbrett begann zu leuchten. Genau das was wir nach sechs Monaten ohne Probleme und kurz vor dem Verkauf des Autos gebrauchen konnten! Wir fuhren also zur nächsten Werkstatt, wo man uns eröffnete, dass es wahrscheinlich ein Problem mit den Zündkerzen war, die man alle austauschen müsse, was gute 400 Dollar kosten sollte. Wir waren etwas schockiert darüber und erklärten dem Mechaniker, dass diese Summe schlicht nicht mehr in unserem Budget unterzubringen war und wir erst einmal überlegen mussten was wir nun tun würden. Da ich, dank so manch schlechter Erfahrung in der Vergangenheit ein gesundes Misstrauen gegenüber Auto-Werkstätten entwickelt habe, begannen wir nach Alternativen zu suchen. Die ersten beiden Konkurrenzunternehmen, die wir abfuhren, sagten uns, dass sie in den nächsten paar Tagen voll ausgebucht waren, aber bei der dritten Werkstatt schloss ein junger Mechaniker direkt sein Diagnose-Gerät an, tauschte eine Zündkerze aus und 20 Minuten und 40 Dollar später schnurrte unser Auto wieder wie ein Kätzchen. Darüber waren wir mehr als froh und gönnten uns zur Feier des Tages einen kleinen Einkaufsbummel in Neu Ulms deutschem Laden, wo wir deutsche Kekse, Suppe, Pudding und Schokolade im Angebot kauften.

Unser gratis Campingplatz am See war allerdings noch zu weit von Minneapolis entfernt, also fuhren wir weiter zu unserer zweiten Option, dem High Island Creek Park in der Nähe des schnuckeligen, kleinen, historischen Ortes Henderson. Dort kamen wir kurz vor dem Labor Day Wochenende (Amerikanischer Feiertag) an. Als das Wochenende schließlich kam, kamen mit ihm eine ganze Horde von Leuten, die fast alle ihre Pferde dabei hatten und der Platz füllte sich bis zum letzten Fleckchen. Es war immer noch sehr heiß und schwül und all die Pferdekacke verlieh dem Park ein gewisses Aroma. Wir blieben trotzdem und begannen, die letzten Reparaturen an unserem Camper durchzuführen. Sobald das lange Wochenende rum war, verschwanden die Leute aber schnell wieder und wir waren erneut ganz allein dort. An einem Tag als wir durch Henderson fuhren, waren wir etwas überrascht in dem sonst so verschlafenen Örtchen auf einmal ein reges Treiben vorzufinden. Die Straßen waren voller Leute und Dutzender schöner, alter Autos. Wir hatten zufällig eine der regelmäßig stattfindenden Oldtimer-Paraden erwischt und spazierten durch den Ort während wir uns liebevoll restaurierte und gepflegte amerikanische Autos aus den letzten 100 Jahren ansahen. Das Ereignis, das uns von Henderson aber wohl am meisten im Gedächtnis bleiben wird, begab sich als wir in den örtlichen Schnapsladen gingen um uns mit Alkohol für unseren Grillabend einzudecken. Als wir die Regale abgrasten und nach geeigneten Spirituosen schauten, hörte ich plötzlich ein merkwürdiges Geräusch aus einem Hinterzimmer. Scherzhaft sagte ich zu der Ladenbesitzerin „Hört sich an als würden Sie da hinten eine kleine Ziege halten!“, woraufhin sie erwiderte „Ja, tu ich auch. Wollt ihr sie sehen?“. Was für eine Frage, natürlich wollten wir sie sehen und das Ziegenbaby war einfach zum Knuddeln. Wir erfuhren, dass ihr Frauchen vorhatte sich einen kleinen Nebenerwerb mit der Herstellung von Ziegenkäse zu eröffnen und die kleine Ziege sollte quasi der Testballon werden.

Schließlich war es an der Zeit nach Minneapolis weiterzuziehen, oder vielmehr nach Edina, das direkt am Rand davon liegt. Dorthin waren wir von Anne, Carla und Wieland eingeladen worden. Als Janina noch zur Schule ging, waren sie so nett ihr für ein halbes Jahr Unterschlupf zu gewähren. Sie bewiesen nun erneut ihre Gastfreundschaft indem sie uns für zwei Wochen bei sich aufnahmen, während derer wir versuchen wollten unseren Truck Camper in der Gegend zu verkaufen. Ich selbst hatte Wieland nur ein Mal in Deutschland getroffen und kannte seine Frau Anne und ihre Tochter Carla noch gar nicht. Sie haben noch zwei weitere Töchter, die aber bereits ausgezogen waren und in New York und Amsterdam leben. Wir wurden sehr herzlich empfangen und aßen erst einmal alle zusammen zu Abend. Wir bekamen sogar unser eigenes Zimmer und begannen direkt damit es mit all dem Kram anzufüllen, die wir im Laufe von sechs Monaten in unserem Camper angesammelt hatten. Durch unsere sehr aufmerksamen, großzügigen und lieben Gastgeber fühlten wir uns von Anfang an heimisch und wir allesamt schienen direkt gegenseitig unsere Gesellschaft zu genießen. Wieland und Anne gaben sich große Mühe, damit wir möglichst viel von der Gegend zu sehen bekamen und uns wohlfühlten.

Unsere Zeit in Edina war allerdings recht betriebsam, da wir immer noch ein bisschen was am Camper zu werkeln hatten, unseren Reiseblog aktualisieren mussten und natürlich versuchten mussten den Truck Camper verkauft zu bekommen. Anne und Wieland führten uns zudem mehrmals zum Essen aus, zeigten uns das geschäftige Treiben in Minneapolis Welt-Markt und nahmen uns außerdem eines Sonntags mit auf eine „Renaissance Kirmes“. Das deutsche Äquivalent dazu (Mittelaltermärkte) hatte ich früher des Öfteren besucht. Dort war es meist in erster Linie darum gegangen das Mittelalter möglichst authentisch darzustellen. Eine amerikanische „Renaissance fair“ unterscheidet sich davon doch recht spürbar. Zunächst einmal geht es dabei nicht um historisch korrekte Darstellung mittelalterlicher Zeiten und eigentlich auch gar nicht zwingend um reale Geschichte. Man läuft dort auch Besuchern über den Weg, die als Feen oder Elfen verkleidet sind und Plüsch-Drachen auf der Schulter hocken haben oder Elfenflügel am Rücken tragen. Man kann außerdem zum Beispiel auf Kamelen oder Elefanten reiten und von Stand zu Stand spazieren, die oft eher so aussahen, als seien sie einem Vergnügungspark entnommen worden. Wieland hatte beschlossen an dem Tag seine deutschen Lederhosen zur Schau zu tragen – wahrscheinlich weil es dort sowieso niemandem besonders aufgefallen wäre. Da Anne und Wieland auch einen Hund haben, einen kleinen Boston Terrier, gestaltete sich der Einlass zu der Veranstaltung etwas aufwändig. Der Hund musste fotografiert werden, Formulare mussten ausgefüllt werden, eine Eintrittsgebühr war zu entrichten, die sogar höher war als die für die menschlichen Besucher und ich glaube es musste sogar irgendein Zettel vom Tierarzt vorgezeigt werden. Es war aber alle Mühen wert, denn es gab eine Menge zu sehen und zu tun und wir hatten einen tollen Tag dort. Das Einzige worüber ich mir aber ein Kopfschütteln nicht verkneifen konnte war als man mir verweigerte einen Becher Bier zu kaufen, da ich meinen Reisepass samt amerikanischem Visum nicht dabei hatte. Naja, solange das heißt, dass ich noch wie unter 21 aussehe, kann ich damit leben.

Als wir in Edina angekommen waren, hatte bereits eine gewisse Nervosität bei uns eingesetzt, da das allgemeine Interesse unseren Truck Camper zu kaufen erheblich geringer war als wir erwartet hatten. Die Saison stand kurz vor ihrem Ende und wir wussten nicht so recht was tun. Wir kontaktierten nach und nach alle möglichen Händler, aber niemand hatte Interesse an unserem geliebten Truck samt Camper. Selbst eine deutliche Preisreduzierung schien keinen Effekt zu haben. Wieland hatte eine Möglichkeit aufgestöbert unser Gefährt auf einem Gebrauchtwagen-Parkplatz abzustellen und auf Kommission verkaufen zu lassen. Wir waren zwar froh über diese Option, aber betrachteten sie trotzdem als Notlösung. Bevor wir nach Deutschland zurückkehren mussten, wollten wir noch ein paar Tage in New York verbringen und dafür brauchten wir etwas Geld in der Tasche. Zudem hatten wir damit kalkuliert ein paar Tausend Euro mit nach Hause nehmen zu können, um die Zeit zu überbrücken bis ich mein erstes Gehalt bekommen würde. Die Lage sah eher düster aus und als wir das Auto gründlich wuschen und dabei auch den Motor reinigten, spielte der zu allem Überfluss auf einmal wieder verrückt. Dasselbe Problem, von dem wir geglaubt hatten es in New Ulm losgeworden zu sein, machte sich wieder bemerkbar und war sogar noch schlimmer geworden. Wir mussten als erneut zu einer Werkstatt fahren und das Auto prüfen lassen. Wieder war Feuchtigkeit in die Zündkerzen gelangt, was zwar relativ schnell zu beheben war, aber unsere schwindenden Geldreserven um weitere 200 $ reduzierte.

Wieland und Anne versuchten uns auf andere Gedanken zu bringen und hatten vor uns auf einen Wochenend-Camping-Trip mit ihrem neuen Wohnwagen mitzunehmen. Wieland hatte uns auch durch den betrieb geführt, in dem er arbeitet und seinem Boss Marty von unserer Reise erzählt. Marty schien unser Abenteuer zu gefallen und so lud er uns ein ihn in Mora besuchen zu kommen. Dort besaß er ein großes Grundstück und stellte uns in Aussicht, dass er unseren Truck Camper dort unterstellen und ihn potentiellen Käufern zeigen konnte, falls wir ihn nicht verkauft bekämen bevor wir Minnesota verlassen mussten. Daher war geplant, dass Janina und ich mit unserem Camper nach Mora fahren würden und Anne, Wieland und Carla später mit dem Wohnwagen nachkämen, um uns einzusammeln. Der Camper würde übers Wochenende dort stehen bleiben und wir würden ihn auf dem Rückweg wieder einsammeln. Wir fuhren also nach Mora und trafen Marty, der neugierig darauf war was wir auf Reisen erlebt hatten und welche Eindrücke wir aus Latein-Amerika mitgenommen hatten. Wir lernten außerdem einen seiner Söhne und dessen reizende Freundin kennen, die gerade dabei waren einen kleinen Bio-Bauernhof aufzubauen, was wir uns interessiert ansahen. Die Zeit verging wie im Fluge und von Wieland, Anne und Carla war weit und breit nichts zu sehen. Als sie schließlich mir einige Verspätung am Nachmittag eintrudelten erfuhren wir, dass das Auto, das den Wohnwagen zog, plötzlich dieselben Probleme aufwies wie unseres. Anscheinend waren unsere Auto-Probleme ansteckend gewesen, oder es lag einfach daran, dass in beiden Autos exakt dasselbe Motor-Modell verbaut war. Wir mussten unsere Pläne also kurzerhand ändern und die Nacht auf Marty’s Grundstück verbringen, während Wieland den Wagen zur nächsten Werkstatt in Mora brachte. Da wir schon einmal dort waren und es etwas zu tun gab, packten wir mit an die große Scheune auf Marty’s Anwesen auszuräumen und herzurichten. Dort sollte nämlich am folgenden Abend eine Spendenaktion für die demokratische Partei stattfinden. Im Gegenzug brachte Marty uns in seinem Obstgarten bei wie man mit einem Atlatl (Speerschleuder) umging. Ich kannte das Gerät bereits aus meinem Archäologiestudium, hatte aber noch nie eines in der Hand gehalten. Vereinfacht gesagt ist es ein Stück Holz, das es einem ermöglicht einen aufgelegten Speer weiter und mit mehr Kraft zu werfen, als man es mit bloßer Hand könnte. Es ist eine sehr alte Jagd-Waffe, die bereits seit der Steinzeit bekannt ist. Wir waren überrascht zu erfahren, dass es sogar einen amerikanischen Atlatl-Club gibt, dem Marty angehörte. Wir hatten eine Menge Spaß dabei die Speerschleuder auszuprobieren und waren ein bisschen stolz als Marty verkündete, dass wir wohl Naturtalente sein.

Am nächsten Morgen holte Wieland das Auto aus der Werkstatt und wir zogen weiter zum Big Lake Campingplatz in der Nähe von Duluth, aber während der Fahrt wurde klar, dass das Auto immer noch nicht ganz in Ordnung war. Der arme Wieland musste also erneut eine Werkstatt ansteuern und wiederum einen Tag später schien das Problem endgültig behoben zu sein. Er wirkte etwas geknickt, dass wir während unseres Ausflugs so viele Schwierigkeiten zu überwinden hatten, denn das war noch nicht alles. Der Hund wurde plötzlich krank und fing an zu humpeln und die Wasserpumpe auf dem Campingplatz gab den Geist auf. Wir ließen uns die Laune trotzdem nicht verderben, machten einen Grill-Abend und amüsierten uns später köstlich über das Grüppchen von selbsternannten Wasserpumpen-Experten, die versucht das Problem zu lösen während wir am Lagerfeuer saßen und Ihnen zuhörten. Am Tag drauf fuhren wir dann zum Ufer des Lake Superior, besuchten Shovel Point und genossen gutes, mexikanisches Essen in Duluth. Als wir nach Edina zurückkehrten, warteten wir voller Zuversicht darauf, dass einige Leute vorbei kamen um sich unseren Truck Camper anzusehen. Bevor wir zum Lake Superior aufgebrochen waren, hatten wir den Preis noch einmal reduziert, was endlich dazu geführt hatte, dass wir ein paar Anrufe von ernsthaften Interessenten bekommen hatten. Leider wollte ihn dann aber doch keiner tatsächlich kaufen und wir waren wieder bei null. Uns blieben nur noch wenige Tage und so langsam setzte Verzweiflung ein, also machten wir unser Angebot noch günstiger und kontaktierten weitere Händler. Es half alles nichts. Als Janina und ich dann einen Ausflug in das hübsche kleine Städtchen Stillwater machten, bekamen wir doch noch ein paar Anrufe wegen unserem Camper und jemand namens Tom sagte er würde gern am nächsten Tag vorbeikommen und ihn sich ansehen. Der Haken war aber, dass er nicht so viel Geld zur Verfügung hatte wie wir angegeben hatten, wie er uns gleich eröffnete. Wir mussten also darüber nachdenken, aber da wir sowieso keine anderen Optionen hatten und das Auto auch lieber an eine Privatperson, als an einen Händler verkaufen wollten, sagten wir das sei ok und er solle trotzdem kommen. Der nächste Tag kam, Tom und seine Frau tauchten auf, begutachteten unseren Camper, machten eine kurze Probefahrt und wollten den Handel direkt besiegeln. Wir machten schnell noch ein letztes Foto von uns vor unserem Camper und waren etwas geschockt als eine halbe Stunde später unser geliebtes Zuhause der letzten sechs Monate plötzlich von uns wegfuhr, als wir mit Tränen in den Augen auf der Straße standen und ihm nachsahen. Das einzige Souvenir, das wir davon haben ist unser Nummernschild, das Tom uns freundlicherweise per Post hinterherschickte sobald er den Wagen umgemeldet hatte. Es hängt nun an unserer Wohnzimmerwand. Tom und seine Frau sind Rentner und erzählten uns, dass sie den Camper dazu benutzen wollten um auf Goldsuche zu gehen. Wir hoffen, dass sie damit ebenso glücklich werden wie wir es waren und irgendwo den Jackpot finden!

Wir verkauften den Camper nur zwei Tage bevor wir Minnesota verlassen und ins Flugzeug nach New York steigen mussten und schätzen uns glücklich, dass es am Ende doch noch geklappt hatte. Den letzten Tag verbrachten wir damit unser Zimmer aus- und aufzuräumen und, unsere Sachen zu packen und schnell noch einen Haarschnitt zu bekommen. Erstaunlicherweise schafften wir es all unsere Dinge in einen Koffer, einen großen und zwei kleine Rucksäcke zu stopfen. Wir kochten außerdem ein letztes Mal ein deutsches Gericht für unsere fantastischen Gastgeber um uns dafür zu bedanken, dass sie uns aufgenommen hatten. Sie hatten sich allesamt als sehr sympathische und gutgelaunte Menschen entpuppt und wuchsen mir trotz der relativ kurzen Zeit schnell ans Herz. Schließlich war es aber an der Zeit Abschied zu nehmen und das Flugzeug zur letzten Station unserer einjährigen Reise zu besteigen, das gleichzeitig die Stadt war, die ich immer schon einmal hatte sehen wollen seitdem ich ein Kind war – New York. Aus irgendeinem Grund haben wir in Minneapolis selbst nicht ein einziges Foto gemacht. Ich nehme an durch die ganze Camper-Verkaufsaktion waren wir mit unseren Gedanken insgesamt einfach woanders gewesen. Minneapolis ist aber eine sehr schöne und sehr grüne Stadt, was man uns nun wohl einfach unbesehen glauben muss.