IMG_3993

South Dakota

Leaving Wyoming behind us we declared the infamous Western-Town of Deadwood to be our first destination in South Dakota. We mainly knew it from the Deadwood TV series and were curious to see what the town looked like nowadays. The town had only been founded in 1876 when a lot of people came to the Black Hills to dig for gold. In a way Deadwood is very similar to Cody since both towns make a living off of the tourists that come because of their Wild West history. The historic main street and town center were nice enough but crammed with souvenir shops and casinos. Gambling has been made legal in Deadwood in the late 80ies since money was needed for rebuilding after a severe fire had ravaged the town.

Abandoned house on the prairie
Abandoned house on the prairie

Again we were exploring a place where some legendary Wild West figures had tread before. Wild Bill Hickok and Calamity Jane had both lived in Deadwood for some time and both have found their final resting place on the Mount Moriah cemetery. Wild Bill had been shot in the back in one of the town’s saloons while he was playing cards while Calamity Jane died only 27 years later in a hotel room in South Dakota. In her autobiography it becomes quite evident that she had been very fond of Wild Bill and it is rumoured that it was her wish to be buried right beside his grave and that’s what happened. To this day people visit their graves and leave small offerings like bullets, money, whisky, cigarettes and more.

"Typical" South Dakotan tourist attraction with real lifelike Native American dummy.
“Typical” South Dakotan tourist attraction with real lifelike Native American dummy.

The Saloon No. 10 where Wild Bill met his untimely end doesn’t exist anymore but there is a Saloon No. 10 on Deadwood’s main street even today. There you can watch Wild Bill getting shot all over again every day of the week and of course we went and had a look. Even if it’s not the original saloon where the dastardly deed was done they at least have the original chair hanging above the door on which Wild Bill sat at the time of his death. We enjoyed some beer and sandwiches while we were waiting for the show to start and learned a bit more about Wild Bill and the history of Deadwood from all the historic photos they put up on the walls of the very authentic looking saloon. The show itself was pretty good and the actors were much better than the ones we had seen in Cody.

Today's Saloon No. 10 in Deadwood, South Dakota.
Today’s Saloon No. 10 in Deadwood, South Dakota.

Our next stop after Deadwood was the quite curious monument of Mount Rushmore. It is a National Monument and there is no entrance fee but still you don’t get in for free. There is only one huge parking lot and it costs 11 $ to leave your car there. In theory your ticket would entitle you to come back again and again but who really does that after having seen the monument once? There is a short paved trail that leads you to the foot of the monument and the rest of the relatively small area. It was amazing to see those giant heads of former US presidents that had been chiselled into the mountainside! Still I couldn’t help but smile when I thought that “defacing” and “refacing” a whole mountain had been a very american thing to do.

Abraham Lincoln's giant head. The other presidents from left to right are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Theodore Roosevelt.
Abraham Lincoln’s giant head. The other presidents from left to right are George Washington, Thomas Jefferson and Theodore Roosevelt.

After we had admired the monument and got back to the entrance we learned that the former president of the USA Thomas Jefferson had invented a recipe for ice cream already in the late 18th century and for 5,50 $ you could try a scoop right there. We passed on that and left for Custer City to find a place where we could use the internet. On the way we also drove past the Crazy Horse Memorial. It’s very near to Mount Rushmore and it’s scale is even bigger. It depicts Crazy Horse, an Oglala Lakota warrior, on his horse. When it’s finished (which is estimated to take another 100 years) the horse’s head alone will be as big as all four president’s heads of Mount Rushmore. After some 50 years of work so far only the head has been finished though. We only saw it from afar since there is a quite steep entrance fee for the monument itself.

The day was still young and we were near the Jewel Caves. We had heard about wild caving tours where you were led through parts of cave systems that usually are not accessible to the public. This also includes climbing a bit or crawling through tiny gaps and tunnels. At Wind Cave they have a concrete block in front of the entrance and make you squeeze through it to prove that you fit before they let you go on the wild caving tour. In Jewel Cave there was a similar tour and we had tried to make a reservation for that. The only problem was that they only do them in weekends and in small groups so we would have needed to stay in the general area for about a week which we didn’t want to do. Our time in the USA was running out after all. So we only did a short, free tour through Jewel Cave, bought a “National Park” edition of Monopoly in the cave store and found a spot for the night in the woods near Custer. Of course we played a round of Monopoly right away that evening when suddenly the worst thunderstorm started we had experienced since the rainy season in Costa Rica. Hail was hammering down on the roof of our camper like crazy and made such a din that we had to cover our ears. Outside the night looked like we were standing under a broken strobe light and whole series of lightnings flashed in the sky every few seconds for about half an hour. It looked almost unreal and felt like we were watching an old movie where they got a little carried away with the special effects.

A cowgirl on the prairie.
A cowgirl on the prairie.

The next day we continued our way east. We had decided to pay the last National Park along our route a visit – the Badlands National Park. We also intended to stop at the Wall Drug Store since we had seen their billboards for literally hundreds of miles and wanted to see what all the fuss was about. At first it had only been a small drug store in Wall, South Dakota but when they started to offer free ice water and coffee for 5 cents business picked up. They’re still doing that by the way. Today the “Wall Drug” is kind of a cowboy-themed mall that attracts lots of tourists. To make things short – we were a bit disappointed with it and didn’t stay there for very long. It felt a bit like wandering through the set of a B-movie or a decades old amusement park. We found a very nice spot for the night on a grassy hill above the Badlands and had a fantastic view from our camper (another great find on freecampsites.net).

Our truck camper at the edge of the Badlands.
Our truck camper at the edge of the Badlands.
The view from our camper.
The view from our camper.

In the morning we broke camp and headed into the actual National Park but the weather had changed and it was very hazy. Also it was too hot and humid to go hiking like we had planned. So we just drove to the free campground in the park and found ourselves a spot there. That was nice since there were Bisons roaming around freely and they even wandered around right on the campground. One guy got a little too close with his camera and a Bison chased him into his car, which we found quite funny to watch. They weren’t aggressive at all though.
One thing that has to be said about the Badlands National Park is that the gravel roads there are just plain horrible. We were pretty used to gravel roads at that point but we had never encountered such bad and extensive cases of washboards on the road and driving there was slow going and pretty aggravating. Still we took the scenic loop and drove past a bison herd and several prairie dog colonies. Of course we had to stop for the furry little fellas to try and get some good video footage of them.

A bison taking a dust-bath on the campground.
A bison taking a dust-bath on the campground.
A campground encounter.
A campground encounter.

The Badlands are a weird and barren but beautiful place. It has been called “bad lands” by several groups of people like the Lakotas or early french trappers who came there. It’s difficult to travel through the area and while you can find water there it’s very chalky and not potable. Still it’s a fascinating place and especially around sunrise and sunset the light lets all the contrasts and rock formations appear even more otherworldly. It’s also interesting to visit due to all the wildlife abundant there, like bison, coyotes and prairie dogs or the animal fossils that can be found in some places. Still, for us it probably would rank lowest of all the National Parks we had visited in the United States. Janina doesn’t like scraggy landscapes at all and there wasn’t that much to see or do compared to the other National Parks.

The roughest parts of the Badlands.
The roughest parts of the Badlands.
Another view from our camper at the outskirts of the Badlands.
Another view from our camper at the outskirts of the Badlands.

When we felt that we had seen enough of the Badlands we again drove east and made our next stop not too far away where a National Historic Monument had piqued my interest. I had read about a decommissioned Minuteman missile silo that was open to the public. For those who have never heard the term before – a Minuteman is an intercontinental thermonuclear ballistic missile and the silo was one of the places where soldiers would sit in a bunker and wait for the order to start the end of the world. I was curious how the Americans would present this part of their history and gruesome Cold War relic. I have to be honest here and say that I was afraid the gun-loving USA with their biggest military budget of the whole planet might not see a weapon of mass destruction as something inherently negative, but maybe even as something to proud of. When we entered the small facility and saw the souvenir shop right away it became quite obvious that I wasn’t too far off with my assumption. You could buy Minuteman coffee mugs and t-shirts that said “Deterring War, Preserving Peace” which sounds like a special kind of crazy. There were also construction kits including models of all the nuclear missiles America and Russia ever built and postcards that showed the most cynical aspect of the whole thing – a photograph of the heavy blast door at the bunker entrance on which soldiers had painted the logo of Domino’s pizza delivery service. They also painted a Minuteman II missile on it and picked up one of Domino’s old slogans “World-wide delivery [of your nuclear missile] in 30 minutes or less or the next one is free”. I don’t even know how to comment on that. I decided that I had seen enough so we left again without visiting the actual missile silo.

We took a picture of the dubious postcard.
We took a picture of the dubious postcard.

According to our guide book and maps there wasn’t much left for us to see in South Dakota. We made another stop to do some laundry in a little town called Kadoka. It seemed like a typical small, rural town and only a handful of people were out on the streets, a lot of them wearing cowboy hats. We found a coin laundry that apparently had been teleported there right from the 70ies and while we waited for the washer to finish we had some coffee for 30 cents and the worst Cappuccino since Mexico in the diner next door. Somehow it fit our general impression of the part of the USA we were in. The land is very flat, there’s not a lot of forests or trees to be seen along the highway and you just drive through fields to your right and left for hours on end. It is very rural and overall sometimes rather boring. Maybe that’s why the people there get pretty creative with inventing tourist attractions. Never before had we seen so many billboards telling us about the world’s biggest, the world’s best or the world’s only this or that. Our last stops in South Dakota were in Mitchell, where some billboards advertising the world’s only Corn Palace had lured us to and a night on the Walmart parking lot of Sioux Falls, where we bought some things we needed to spruce up our camper a bit before trying to sell it.

The world's only Corn Palace. The outside walls are decorated anew every year with murals made entirely from corn.
The world’s only Corn Palace. The outside walls are decorated anew every year with murals made entirely of corn.
Another mobile chapel we saw at a truck stop.
Another mobile chapel we saw at a truck stop.

 

German version – deutsche Version

Wir ließen Wyoming hinter uns und steuerten unser erstes Ziel in South Dakota an – die berüchtigte Western-Stadt Deadwood. Wir kannten sie eigentlich nur aus der gleichnamigen Fernsehserie und waren neugierig darauf wie der Ort heutzutage aussieht. Man gründete die Stadt erst 1876, nachdem in den umliegenden Black Hills Gold gefunden worden war und jede Menge Menschen in die Gegend strömten um dort ihr Glück zu suchen. Auf gewisse Weise ist Deadwood sehr ähnlich zu Cody, denn beide Orte leben von ihrem Wildwest-Erbe und den Touristen, die davon angelockt werden. Die historische Hauptstraße und der Stadtkern von Deadwood gefielen uns zwar ganz gut, waren aber leider mit Souvenirläden und Casinos vollgestopft. Die Stadt hatte sich Ende der 80er Jahre zu einer ungewöhnlichen Maßnahme entschieden, nachdem ein schweres Feuer großen Schaden angerichtet hatte und man Geld für den Wiederaufbau benötigte. So wurde Spielen kurzerhand legalisiert um das nötige Geld in die Kassen zu spülen und gleichzeitig die Wirtschaft dauerhaft anzukurbeln.

Wieder einmal wandelten wir in den Fußstapfen berühmter oder zumindest berüchtigter Wildwest-Figuren. Wild Bill Hickok und Calamity Jane lebten einst beide für einige Zeit in Deadwood und fanden dort auch ihre letzte Ruhe auf dem Mount Moriah Friedhof. Wild Bill war in einem der Saloons der Stadt hinterrücks erschossen worden während er beim Kartenspiel saß. Calamity Jane lebte noch für weitere 27 Jahre und starb schließlich in einem Hotelzimmer in South Dakota. In ihrer Autobiographie ist offensichtlich, dass Wild Bill ihr sehr viel bedeutet haben muss und es heißt, dass es ihr letzter Wunsch gewesen war neben ihm auf dem Mount Moriah Friedhof beerdigt zu werden und genau das geschah dann auch. Bis heute besuchen viele Leute ihre Gräber und lassen kleine Gaben dort liegen wie z.B. Patronen, Geld, Whisky-Fläschchen, Zigaretten und mehr.

Der Saloon No. 10, in dem Wild Bill sein frühes Ende gefunden hatte, existiert zwar nicht mehr, aber einen Saloon No. 10 gibt es trotzdem auch heute noch an Deadwoods Hauptstraße. Es ist auch einer der mehreren Orte der Stadt, an die man sich begeben kann, wenn man sehen möchte wie Wild Bill täglich erneut in den Rücken geschossen wird. Natürlich ließen wir uns das nicht entgehen und schauten vorbei. Auch wenn es nicht der Original-Saloon ist, in dem sich die feige Tat abspielte, hängt doch über der Tür zumindest der Stuhl, auf dem Wild Bill zum Zeitpunkt seines Todes saß. Wir erfrischten uns mit Bier und Sandwiches, während wir auf die Darbietung warteten und erfuhren dabei noch etwas mehr über Wild Bill und die Geschichte Deadwoods von all den historischen Fotos, welche die Wände des sehr authentisch wirkenden Saloons schmückten. Die kurze Show war dann ziemlich gut und die Darsteller um Längen besser als jene, die wir in Cody gesehen hatten.

Unser nächster Halt nach Deadwood war das kuriose Nationaldenkmal Mount Rushmore. Es kostet zwar keinen Eintritt, aber umsonst kommt man trotzdem nicht rein. Es gibt nur einen einzigen großen Parkplatz und die Parkgebühr beträgt 11 $. Zwar kann man dafür theoretisch das ganze Jahr über immer wiederkommen und dort parken, aber wer macht das schon nachdem man einmal dort war? Es gibt einen kurzen, asphaltierten Rundwanderweg, der durch das relativ kleine Gelände bis zum Fuß des Monuments führt. Es war wirklich erstaunlich diese gigantischen Köpfe früherer US-Präsidenten, die man in den Berg gemeißelt hatte, über uns aufragen zu sehen. Ich konnte mir ein Schmunzeln aber nicht verkneifen als ich dachte wie typisch amerikanisch es doch gewesen war einen ganzen Berg zu „entstellen“, indem man Präsidenten hineinmeißelte.

Nachdem wir das Monument ausreichend bewundert hatten und zurück zum Eingang gelangten, erfuhren wir zu unserer Überraschung noch, dass der ehemalige US-Präsident Thomas Jefferson bereits im späten 18. Jahrhundert ein Eiscreme-Rezept erfunden hatte. Für nur 5,50 $ für eine Kugel konnte man selbiges auch gleich vor Ort probieren. Wir passten und fuhren lieber weiter nach Custer City um dort irgendwo ins Internet zu gehen. Auf dem Weg dorthin kamen wir auch am Crazy Horse Memorial vorbei. Dieses Monument liegt recht nahe bei Mount Rushmore und seine Dimensionen sind noch weitaus gewaltiger. Abgebildet ist dort Crazy Horse, ein Krieger des Oglala Lakota-Stammes, auf seinem Pferd. Wenn es fertiggestellt ist (was schätzungsweise weitere 100 Jahre dauern wird) ist allein der Kopf des Pferdes so groß wie alle Präsidentenköpfe von Mount Rushmore zusammen. Nachdem man bereits gut 50 Jahre an dem Monument herumwerkelte ist bisher aber nur der Kopf von Crazy Horse fertig geworden. Wir sahen das Ganze nur aus der Ferne, denn der Eintrittspreis ist unverschämt hoch.

Der Tag war noch jung und wir befanden uns in der Nähe der Jewel Höhlen. Wir hatten über sogenannte „Wilde Höhlen“-Touren gelesen, wo man durch Teile von Höhlensystemen geführt wird, die normalerweise nicht zugänglich sind. Dabei muss man auch ein bisschen klettern, durch enge Tunnel kriechen und sich durch winzige Löcher quetschen. Vor dem Eingang der Wind Höhle steht ein Betonklotz mit einem Loch, durch das man sich hindurchzwängen muss, um zu beweisen, dass man an der „Wilden Höhlentour“ teilnehmen kann ohne mittendrin steckenzubleiben. In den Jewel Höhlen gab es eine ähnliche Tour und wir hatten versucht dafür ein paar Plätze zu reservieren. Das einzige Problem war, dass diese Touren nur an Wochenenden stattfanden und mit ziemlich kleinen Gruppen, also hätten wir noch für eine gute Woche in der Gegend bleiben müssen, um auf den nächstmöglichen Termin zu warten, was uns aber nicht so recht war. Immerhin neigte sich unsere Zeit in den USA ihrem Ende zu. Wir machten also nur eine kurze Gratis-Tour durch die Jewel Höhle mit, kauften eine sehr schöne Nationalpark-Edition von Monopoly im Höhlenladen und suchten uns einen Übernachtungsplatz in den Wäldern nahe Custer City. Natürlich spielten wir am Abend auch direkt eine Runde Monopoly in unserem Camper als plötzlich das schlimmste Unwetter über uns hereinbrach, das wir seit der Regenzeit in Costa Rica erlebt hatten. Hagel donnerte auf unser Camperdach mit einer solchen Wucht und einem unsäglichen Getöse, dass wir uns die Ohren zuhalten mussten. Draußen wirkte die Nacht als hätten wir versehentlich unter einem kaputten Stroboskop geparkt, denn alle paar Sekunden flimmerten ganze Serien von Blitzen über den Himmel. Das Schauspiel dauerte ca. eine halbe Stunden und kam uns beinahe etwas unwirklich vor. Wir fühlten uns als würden wir aus unseren Camper-Fenstern direkt in einen alten Film blicken, in dem man es mit den Spezialeffekten etwas übertrieben hatte.

Am folgenden Tag fuhren wir weiter nach Osten. Wir hatten beschlossen dem letzten Nationalpark entlang unserer Route einen Besuch abzustatten – dem Badlands National Park. Außerdem wollten wir unterwegs einen Halt beim „Wall Drug Store“ einlegen, dessen Werbeschilder wir bereits seit Hunderten Meilen immer wieder gesehen hatten. Anfangs war es nur eine kleine Apotheke im Örtchen Wall in South Dakota gewesen, aber als man irgendwann anfing Kaffee für 5 Cent zu verkaufen und Reisenden gratis Eiswasser anzubieten, explodierte das Geschäft. Beides bekommt man übrigens heute noch dort in unveränderter Weise. Heutzutage ist „Wall Drug“ aber eher zu einer Art kleinem Einkaufszentrum/Erlebnispark mit Cowboy-Leitmotiv geworden und zieht Massen von Touristen an. Um es kurz zu machen – wir waren eher enttäuscht davon und blieben nicht lange. Es kam uns ein bisschen so vor als würden wir durch die Filmkulisse eines drittklassigen Films oder durch einen Jahrzehnte alten Vergnügungspark laufen. Im Anschluss fanden wir ein sehr hübsches Fleckchen für die Nacht auf einer grasbewachsenen Anhöhe oberhalb der Badlands (ein weiterer toller Fund auf freecampsites.net) und genossen eine grandiose Aussicht von unserem Camper.

Am Morgen brachen wir unsere Zelte wieder ab und fuhren in den Nationalpark hinein, aber leider hatte das Wetter sich etwas geändert und es war sehr diesig geworden. Außerdem war es viel zu heiß und drückend um wandern zu gehen, so wie wir es eigentlich vorgehabt hatten. Wir fuhren also kurzerhand einfach zum gratis Campingplatz inmitten des Parks und sicherten uns dort ein Plätzchen. Dort gefiel es uns ganz gut denn ein paar Bisons wanderten dort umher und streunten auch direkt auf dem Campingplatz herum. Ein Kerl kam ihnen mit seiner Kamera etwas zu nahe und wurde zur Strafe von einem der Bisons in sein Auto gescheucht, was wir äußerst amüsiert beobachteten. Aggressiv waren die Tiere aber überhaupt nicht.

Eine Sache muss man über den Badlands Nationalpark unbedingt wissen und das ist, dass die Schotterstraßen dort die furchtbarsten waren, die wir je erlebt hatten. An Schotterstraßen waren wir mittlerweile vollkommen gewöhnt aber so schlimme und ausgedehnte Waschbrett-Auswaschungen wie in den Badlands hatten wir noch nirgends erlebt. Dort entlang zu fahren ging mit unserem schweren Vehikel nur ziemlich langsam und unter nervigem Dauergeholper. Wir fuhren trotzdem die Rundstrecke ab, die einem tolle Aussichten bieten sollte, und kamen dabei an einer Bisonherde und ein paar weiteren Präriehund-Kolonien vorbei. Natürlich mussten wir Halt machen, um zu versuchen die pelzigen, kleinen Kerlchen auf Video zu bannen.

Die Badlands sind eine merkwürdige und sehr karge, aber dennoch wunderschöne Landschaft. „Bad lands“, also „schlechtes Land“ wurde die Gegend von mehreren Gruppen von Menschen genannt, die es dorthin verschlagen hatte, wie z.B. die Lakota-Indianer oder frühe französische Pelzjäger. Das Gebiet lässt sich nur schwer durchqueren und auch wenn es dort Wasser gibt, ist es sehr kalkhaltig und nicht genießbar. Dennoch ist es ein faszinierender Ort und besonders nach Sonnenaufgang oder kurz vor Sonnenuntergang lässt das Licht all die Kontraste und Felsformationen noch stärker hervortreten und noch außerirdischer aussehen. Ein Besuch lohnt sich auch wegen der Tiere, die dort vorkommen wie Bisons, Koyoten und Präriehunden und wegen all der Fossilien, die sich an manchen Stellen finden lassen. Auf unserer persönlichen Skala der amerikanischen Nationalparks nehmen die Badlands trotzdem den letzten Platz ein, denn im Vergleich zu den anderen Parks kann man dort nicht allzu viel sehen oder unternehmen. Janina mag außerdem ganz karge Landschaften nicht besonders.

Wir hatten genug von den Baldands gesehen und setzten unseren Weg nach Osten fort, um kurze Zeit später noch einen Zwischenstopp bei einem historischen Nationaldenkmal einzulegen, das mein Interesse geweckt hatte. Ich hatte über einen außer Dienst gestellten Minuteman Raketensilo gelesen, den man sich ansehen konnte. Für alle, die den Begriff „Minuteman“ noch nie gehört haben – das ist eine interkontinentale Atomrakete und der Silo war einer der Orte, an denen Soldaten hockten und auf den Befehl warteten das Ende der Welt einzuläuten. Ich war neugierig darauf wie die Amerikaner mit diesem Teil ihrer Geschichte und diesem schaurigen Relikt des Kalten Krieges umgingen. Ich muss ehrlicherweise sagen, dass ich Befürchtungen hegte, dass die waffenliebenden Amis mit ihrem weltweit größten Militärbudget eine Massenvernichtungswaffe vielleicht gar nicht als etwas grundsätzlich Schlechtes ansehen, sondern vielleicht sogar stolz darauf waren. Als wir die kleine Anlage betraten und direkt den Souvenirladen erblickten, war schnell klar, dass ich mit meinen Befürchtungen nicht wirklich falsch lag. Man konnte dort Minuteman-Kaffeetassen kaufen, sowie T-Shirts auf denen unter einer Rakete stand „Den Krieg verhinden, den Frieden erhalten“, was sich irgendwie nach einer ganz speziellen Sorte von Irrsinn anhört. Es gab außerdem Modellbausätze mit allen Nuklearraketen, die die USA und Russland je gebaut hatten und Postkarten, die den zynischsten Aspekt der ganzen Sache klar herausstellten. Darauf war ein Foto zu sehen, das die schwere Bunkertür des Raketen-Silos zeigte, auf die Soldaten das Logo des Domino’s Pizza-Lieferdienstes gemalt hatten. Daneben pinselten sie eine Minuteman-Rakete und einen abgewandelten alten Werbeslogan von Domino’s, der lautete „Weltweite Zustellung [ihrer Atomrakete] innerhalb von 30 Minuten oder weniger, oder die Nächste gibt’s gratis.“ Ich weiß ehrlich gesagt nicht was ich dazu schreiben soll. Ich entschied, dass ich bereits genug gesehen hatte und wir fuhren weiter ohne uns den eigentlichen Raketen-Silo anzusehen.

Laut unserem Reiseführer und unseren Karten gab es in South Dakota nicht mehr besonders viel, das wir uns noch ansehen konnten. Wir hielten noch einmal in Kadoka an, einem kleinen Örtchen abseits des Highways, um dort Wäsche zu waschen. Kadoka kam uns wie ein typisches Dorf auf dem Land vor und auf den Straßen sah man nur eine Handvoll Leute, von denen viele einen Cowboy-Hut trugen. Wir fanden dort einen Waschsalon, den man anscheinend direkt aus den 70er Jahren dorthin teleportiert hatte. Während wir auf unsere Wäsche warteten, tranken wir im kleinen Lokal neben Kaffee für 30 Cent und den miserabelsten Cappuccino seit Mexiko. Irgendwie passte das Örtchen zu dem Eindruck, den wir von dem Teil der USA bekommen hatten, in dem wir uns gerade aufhielten. Die Landschaft ist platt, es gibt kaum Wälder oder Bäume abseits des Highways zu sehen und man fährt stundenlang durch Felder zur Linken und Rechten. Es ist sehr ländlich und insgesamt oft ziemlich öde. Vielleicht ist das auch der Grund warum die Menschen dort recht kreativ darin sind sich Touristen-Attraktionen auszudenken. Nie zuvor hatten wir so viele Schilder gesehen, die der Welt einziges, der Welt bestes oder der Welt größtes Irgendwas beworben. Unsere letzten Stopps in South Dakota machten wir dann in Mitchell, wohin uns ein Werbeschild, das der Welt einzigen Mais-Palast bewarb, gelockt hatte, sowie auf einem Walmart-Parkplatz in Sioux Falls, wo wir einige Dinge einkauften, die wir zum Camper-aufhübschen vor dem Verkauf benötigten.