IMG_3373-22

Yellowstone Park

So, we were in Montana – a cowboy state just like Wyoming if Janina’s memory was correct. We didn’t really know what this state’s most famous attractions would be apart from the small sliver of the Yellowstone National Park that belonged to Montana. Janina also remembered having been to a Glacier National Park but since there is two of those, one in Montana and one in Canada, she couldn’t really recall which one it had been. We were near the one in Montana and decided to give it a try. We didn’t want to pay for a campground there and were much more interested in getting to the famous Yellowstone Park so we only just drove through the Glacier National Park. It was nice enough though and the wildfire in the eastern part of it we had been told about luckily had been brought under control. It certainly is a nice park but there was the same problem as with the Canadian National Parks we had been to, there weren’t a lot of glaciers still around and it might even seem prudent to consider changing the name of the park to keep up with the ecological developments.

Glacier National Park
Glacier National Park
Mountain goats in Glacier National Park
Mountain goats in Glacier National Park
Mountain goat that has been outfitted with a  radio collar to study their movements
Mountain goat that has been outfitted with a radio collar to study their movements

Before we entered Glacier National Park we had to spend a night near it’s entrance and in that area we came across a somewhat disturbing sight. It was some kind of sign park of a very christian website reminding people of the ten commandments, various sins and God and Jesus in general. We read that nine of ten US citizens believe in god (Jon Krakauer, “Under the banner of heaven”) and that the only thing they fear more than terrorists would be atheists. We were remembered of the guys standing around with signs in Las Vegas or L.A. telling the general population that they were sinners and that a reckoning would come in some way and we couldn’t help but find this funny so we just had to take some pictures.

The weird ten commandment park
The weird ten commandment park

After we drove through the Glacier National Park our only goal was to get the necessary provisions for a longer visit of the Yellowstone National Park. Our travel guide said that the best and most scenic route would be to go through the city of Helena. We trusted it in that regard and in consequence we nearly died of boredom along the way. As soon as we had left the nearer vicinity of the Glacier National Park the landscape changed to boring flat farmland with endless stretches of yellowed grass and there was literally nothing to see for hours on end. It was the first time where I not only engaged the cruise control but also propped my feet up in a comfortable position and was seriously considering for a moment to also take my hands from the steering wheel. The road was always going straight on and on. The rare occasions when another car was passing us or coming the opposite way were actually the only mildly exciting moments since this was the most boring and stupefying piece of road I had ever had the displeasure of travelling on in my entire life.

Somehow we made it to Helena after all and were quite surprised that we ended up liking it. It’s not that small but it seemed like there was nobody living in this town since the streets were empty. OK, it was at a weekend but where have all the people gone? Even in the downtown area the streets were empty and Janina spontaneously proclaimed that Helena would be her new favorite city since it was so calm and nice. It’s also one of the bigger cities in Montana and there’s not too many of those around. The only camping spot for the night we managed to find was the local Walmart parking lot though and when we got there we were quite shocked to see that it’s right across the street from an oil refinery. The whole place was smelling like hot tarmac all the time and we thought that this couldn’t really be healthy. We stayed there anyway since we wanted to visit the local Lewis & Clark Interpretive Center where we got in for free due to our Interagency Pass. For those who have never heard of them – Meriwether Lewis und William Clark had been commissioned in 1803 by president Thomas Jefferson to explore the western part of the USA. This was shortly after the state of Louisiana had been purchased from Napoleon and the western USA were largely unknown land. Lewis’ and Clark’s tasks were to find a route through the area, map it and establish an American presence before the English or other Europeans could stretch their fingers for the land. They were also ordered to study plants and animals and establish trade connections with Indian tribes. Their journey should take them more than two years and become a part of American history. Equally famous as the two gentlemen became Sacagawea, a Shoshine Indian woman, who accompanied the expedition together with her husband and newborn son. We have to say that the Interpretice Center, much like almost all of the National Park and other information centers, is done very well and very informative and entertaining.

A least squirrel trying to get away from Janina's camera
A least squirrel trying to get away from Janina’s camera

After that short trip into American history we made use of another Starbucks store since the best internet connection still is to be had there. When we were done with updating our blog and making some calls home we wanted to leave Helena. When we backed out of our parking space in the parking lot we joked around about crushing something behind us as countless times before. The reason being that you can’t really see anything that’s going on behind our truck and camper combination, even with the extension mirrors. As always I just backed out slowly and cautiously in the hopes that everbody coming up from behind us will just wait – an approach that seems to be the general rule for backing out of parking lots in the USA. Suddenly we heard glass breaking and a nasty crunch and we knew that for once it had gone wrong. Another car was backing up in the opposite direction at the same time and the inevitable happened – we crashed. I got out of the car to see what’s what and promptly realized that the rear window of the other car was shattered. I could see no damage on our truck though and there was only a small flap on the camper that was bent back a bit. The poor lady in the other car was even more shocked than we were and after we exchanged our insurance information her husband came along. As it turned out his son is living in Germany but nobody was really able to be interested in this coincidence very much. We actually could shrug this accident off since there was no damage to our truck or camper; the bent back flap could be righted immediately and that’s it. Of course we contacted our insurance company but they told us that they would just play a waiting game – if the lady from the other car would contact them they would see what is to be done about the damage but if not, so be it. So far we haven’t heard anything from them. By the way – we called the police right away but since the accident happened on a private parking lot they wouldn’t come.

We left Helena and drove to the next bigger town, Great Falls. There we wanted to get the necessary provisions for spending a few nights in the Yellowstone Park before continuing. We ended up spending two nights there, the first one at an inexpensive Bureau of Reclamation campground with lots of deer at night and the second night in the National Forest nearby. We bought lots of packaged food that can be heated in a few minutes and were set for our next hiking tour. Our base of operations should become the little town of West Yellowstone for the beginning.

A dragonfly in Yellowstone
A dragonfly in Yellowstone

West Yellowstone seems to be competely concentrated on the National Park tourism and appears quite artificial. We went to the Park Visitor Center in the afternoon and had no success with obtaining a necessary backcountry hiking permit so we resolved to come back the next day. In the morning we met a very nice older volunteer who was able to get us our backcountry permit. We had to watch a 20-minute video that told us how to behave in the backcountry. Nothing we didn’t know already really but of course they have to make sure. We shared the video presentation with roughly a dozen students from Georgetown University, one of them even being a german. We didn’t really pick a certain area of the park for backcountry hiking and just wanted to see what was still available. That way we ended up with a four nights hike in the Firehole area in the Old Faithful vicinity. Since our hike was planned to start in two day’s time we had some time to kill and used it to see some of the areas with thermal activity in the park and explore some geysers, fumaroles and hot springs. Of course we also saw the probably most famous geyser of the world – Old Faithful himself. In it’s immediate vicinity there is also the nice Old Faithful Inn which was constructed from wood in a pretty unique way.

Lots of people waiting for Old Faithful to erupt
Lots of people waiting for Old Faithful to erupt
Inside the Old Faithful Inn
Inside the Old Faithful Inn

There were two special occassions coming on right at that time – the night of the Perseids meteor shower which happened to be at the same day as our wedding anniversary. I had never realized that coincidence before, even if I had wanted to watch this annual meteor shower for a good 20 years and never suceeded. In some years because I had simply forgotten, some years because I had had other things to do and a lot of years because it had been cloudy and you couldn’t see anything at all. This time we thought we’d be able to share the experience and this way also make our wedding anniversary more special. Only the weather didn’t want to oblige us againand clouds came up. Later that night they largely disappeared again and we were finally able to watch for meteors. We got to see quite a few even if their frequency was far below what we had been led to expect. Our watching started with one very long and bright meteor though and as far as Janina could remember that was even her first one ever. I also tried to take a picture of the meteor shower but dozens of pictures later I had still not suceeded and eventually gave up.

Some of the entertainment to be found in West Yellowstone
Some of the entertainment to be found in West Yellowstone

The first day of our backcountry hike had come and around midday we started. We were able to take our time since there wasn’t a very great distance planned for the first leg of the hike. While we strolled past thermal springs and followed the trail I craned my neck all the time to watch for bisons. I very much wanted to see some and from Janina’s first visit she remembered that they were around everywhere. After a few hours I finally spotted a single one that lay in the grass relaxing. We went past several thermal springs that day and it was nice that there were no fences around them or anything and we could get very near. Some of them looked quite inviting and we almost wanted to hop in for a bath but that was strictly prohibited. It probably is for the better since they’re scalding hot and their water also might be pretty corrosive to boot. When we arrived at our first backcountry campsite we weren’t that thrilled about it. It was lying right in the open and the tiny stream where we could get water was runing through some kind of swamplike field. Still, we had it all for ourselves and were out in nature. At night we heard some coyotes howling in the dark somewhere around us but didn’t see any. The night turned out to be very cold and when we woke up the next morning there was frost glittering everywhere. We had specifically asked the volunteer, who had taken care of our permit, if temperatures might be around the freezing point at night but he had said no, which obviously had been a bit of misinformation.

Everything we needed for a few days in the backcountry spread out in the camper
Everything we needed for a few days in the backcountry spread out in the camper
The Grand Prismatic Spring - it's very hot and the orange stuff are bacteria
The Grand Prismatic Spring – it’s very hot and the orange stuff are bacteria mats
Hot water from the Grand Prismatic Spring runs into the river
Hot water from the Grand Prismatic Spring runs into the river

We continued our hike and left the Fairy Creek Trail behind us. That also meant that there was suddenly nobody else around us. After some seven miles we arrived at our next campsite which was very nice. It was situated on a small hill at the edge of the forest and from there we overlooked a big grassy plain. We hitched our tent a good 100 yards away from the fireplace since there was a double bear warning for that area. Hikers had seen two grizzly bears hanging around the area so we needed to be even a bit more cautious than usual. About a week before we had arrived at Yellowstone some guy had been killed and partially eaten by a bear in the park. That had happened nowhere near where we were though and we weren’t afraid. The guy had spent a few years in the area and gotten careless. He had hiked alone and not carried bearspray with him. We knew by now how to behave in bear country and towards bears and if you do they’re not dangerous at all even if the signs you’d find everywhere in the park told you something else. That was a bit ridiculous really! There were signs that said that bison would be extremely dangerous and all other wildlife too. We had learned that no bit of nature or wildlife is dangerous as long as you don’t frighten the animal. The signs in the Canadian national parks had been very different too. They merely explained that the animals are wild and might feel scared or threatened if you got too close to them or behaved stupidly. It’s not too hard to learn how to behave around them and that way you’ll be fine and the animals too. Anyway, since there was a bear warning for our campsite we had hoped to finally see more grizzlys but we didn’t even see tracks of them during the two nights we stayed there.

One of the numerous hot springs
One of the numerous hot springs
Wolf tracks we found along the trail
Wolf tracks we found along the trail
A bison calf
A bison calf

During the day it had been very windy and we were a bit worried about our camper we had left behind. The reason being that our fridge runs on gas and in high winds the pilot-flame might get blown out which would mean that all the food inside would spoil. In the evening the wind calmed and we were able to enjoy a nice campfire before we turned in for another very chilly night. It should be the first of two at that campsite so the next day we just explored our immediate surroundings. Our map showed a place called Buffalo Meadows and since no trails led there we went cross-country to find it. We thought that if the name is any indicator we might get to see some bisons there but there were nothing to be seen apart from the ubiquitous elk.

Hiking through the Firehole area
Hiking through the Firehole area
A geyser erupting
A geyser erupting
Janina in front of the Lower Falls in the Yellowstone Canyon
Janina in front of the Lower Falls above Yellowstone Canyon

The second night at Firehole Meadows was even colder than the previous ones and when we got up early the following morning everything around us was covered in frost and there were chunks of ice swimming in our water bottles. We weren’t really prepared for that kind of temperatures since we only had our two light summer sleeping bags that had been in use since Costa Rica, and in addition to that one thicker sleeping bag for low temperatures. The light ones we put together to make one big one and inside of that we used the thicker sleeping bag as cover. That way we could endure the cold nights but it dind’t get what one could call cozy. I had gathered a lot of wood the day before and so we were able to build a sizeable campfire to sit at during breakfast and warm ourselves a bit. If not for the fire it would have been a really miserable morning. It got better when we started walking and we had the longest distance of our hike planned for that day. We turned east and knew that we would get back into the tourist-filled areas after a few miles. While we were hiking through the woods at a brisk pace we were warm at least but the weather was not too good. It stayed overcast, windy and rather chilly all the time. Until noon we had decided that we would skip the last night out. At the last campsite that had been assigned to us no wood fires were allowed and in the unexpected cold it wouldn’t have been any fun to stay there. It’s position was only a few miles away from the parking lot where our camper stood anyway. So we changed our plans and hiked back the whole distance to our camper which amounted to around 18 kilometers. On the way we came through some of the more popular areas with thermal features and all the tourists that had come to see them since they could mostly be reached by car.

Bacteria that thrive in hot water
Bacteria that thrive in hot water
Self-portrait?
Self-portrait?

Only a few hundred meters before we had reached our camper we came upon a small herd of bison. At last we were able to see some and from very close too. When we got to our car we realized that our fridge had indeed been blown out earlier that day and that we were lucky to have come back earlier than planned. We were also happy about the heater in our camper and being able to eat something else than convenience food that can become tiring even after only a few days. We headed out of the park again for the night and on the way back to West Yellowstone we got to see another bison. It was calmly wandering around in the middle of the road and that way caused a minor traffic jam.

A bison up close
A bison up close
Another hot spring
Another hot spring

We had enjoyed our backcountry hike in the Yellowstone park even if it couldn’t really be compared to hiking in more remote areas. Still, we had managed to get away from the tourist masses for a while. We also liked the fact that the backcountry permits are pretty inexpensive in Yellowstone and that you get to use the assigned backcountry campsites all alone. Finding a spot on the normal campgrounds inside the park’s boundaires proved to be a bit more difficult as we found out at the day after we got back. Most places fill up early in the day and so we were forced to leave the park for the night again. This time we left through the northeastern entrance and found a National Forest Service campground. It was one of several where no tent-camping is allowed since grizzlys come to the campgrounds sometimes. Another camper told us that a biker had used one of the other sites illegaly while it was closed in the previous year. A bear had gotten into his tent and killed him. Again it has to be said that something like this is extremely rare and usually only happens if somebody does something stupid like keeping food inside the tent etc. It seemed to have scared the campground hosts though since the older lady was patrolling the campground in the evening to check if everybody put their food into the provided bear-safe containers as per instruction. She was also armed with a can of bearspray she kept in hand all the time which drew a smile from us. On the other hand it’s not really amusing that even in or around National Parks people get scared with insensible warning signs about nature or wildlife since there is no reason for that and it only leads to people getting even more estranged from nature than they already are anyway.

A little stream full of bacteria
A little stream full of bacteria
Terraces created by hot water springs
Terraces created by hot water springs

The next day we went back into the park and secured a spot at the Tower Falls campground already in the morning. Then we drove down to the “Grand Canyon of Yellowstone” but for some reason it had been hazy for a few days now so we rather went to explore the northwestern part of the park and explored some more of the areas with thermal activity. After you have seen a number of hot springs, geysers and bubbling lakes it becomes a bit repetitive though and we had already seen the highlights. The Tower Falls campground was pretty cramped and we didn’t much like it there but we didn’t have to endure it for long since we wanted to get up very very early the next morning. Our plan was to go Lamar Valley while it was still dark to try and see some wolves and coyotes there. That area was supposed to be best for that. We managed to get there in time, found a good spot from where we could overlook a lot of the valley and got out our binoculars. We didn’t have any luck though and saw no predators at all. We only heard the coyotes but weren’t able to spot them. The only thing we would see from the wolves should remain the one track we had found during hiking. At least there were lots and lots of bison roaming around the valley again and just like the day before we were able to get really close to them. After that we finally went to the Yellowstone Canyon which was very nice and interesting to see with the different-coloured layers of stone and thermal features down in the gorge. All in all we had managed to see quite a bit of Yellowstone and were ready to move on. We headed east since our next stop should be the town of Cody that had been founded by the famous Wild West legend Buffalo Bill.

 

German version – deutsche Version

Wir befanden uns also in Montana, einem typischen Cowboy-Staat, soweit Janina sich daran erinnerte. Wir wussten nicht wirklich was die größten Sehenswürdigkeiten dieses Staates sind, wenn man mal von dem kleinen Streifen des Yellowstone Parks absieht, der zu Montana gehört. Janina erinnerte sich auch daran vor vielen Jahren einen gewissen Glacier National Park besucht zu haben, aber da es davon zwei gibt, einen in Kanada und einen in Montana, wusste sie nicht mehr so recht in welchem sie gewesen war. Da wir uns sowieso in der Nähe des Parks in Montana befanden, wollten wir ihn uns auch ansehen. Allerdings waren wir nicht geneigt dort einen Campingplatz zu bezahlen und waren zudem mehr auf Yellowstone fixiert; wir fuhren daher einfach nur durch den Glacier Park hindurch. Es gefiel uns ganz gut dort und glücklicherweise hatte man den Waldbrand auf der Ostseite des Parks, von dem wir gehört hatten, bereits unter Kontrolle gebracht. Der Glacier (Gletscher) Nationalpark ist sicher schön, aber er hatte dasselbe Problem die kanadischen Parks, in denen wir gewesen waren –  es gab dort kaum noch Gletscher und mittlerweile sollte man wirklich überlegen den Namen des Parks zu ändern um die ökologische Entwicklung widerzuspiegeln.

Bevor wir in den Glacier Park hineinfuhren, verbrachten wir eine Nacht knapp außerhallb des Eingangs und in der Gegend kamen wir zufällig an einem recht merkwürdigen Anblick vorbei. Es handelte sich dabei um eine Art Schilderwald einer äußerst christlichen Webseite, die anscheinend darauf abzielt Menschen an Gott und die zehn Gebote zu erinnern, sowie an diverse Sünden und Jesus im Allgemeinen. Wir haben gelesen, dass neun von zehn Amerikanern an Gott glauben und Atheisten sogar noch mehr fürchten als Terroristen. Der bizarre Schilderwald erinnerte uns auch an die Typen, die in Las Vegas und Los Angeles mit großen Schildern herumgestanden hatten, auf denen sie der Bevölkerung mitteilten, dass sie Sünder seien und es dafür irgendwann eine Abrechnung geben würde. Wir fanden das Ganze einfach nur amüsant und schossen ein paar Erinnerungsfotos.

Nachdem wir den Glacier Park durchfahren hatten, war unser Hauptanliegen für einen längeren Besuch des Yellowstone Nationalparks einzukaufen. Unser Reiseführer behauptete, dass die beste und schönste Reiseroute dorthin über die Stadt Helena führen würde. Wir vertrauten auf diese Aussage und infolgedessen wären wir unterwegs beinahe vor Langeweile gestorben. Sobald wir die nähere Umgebung des Glacier Parks hinter uns gelassen hatten, veränderte die Landschaft sich zu plattem, langweiligem Land voller Felder und endlosen vergilbten Grasflächen und es gab über Stunden hinweg einfach absolut nichts zu sehen. Zum ersten Mal hatte ich nicht nur den Tempomat eingeschaltet, sondern auch die Füße hochgelegt und erwog sogar für einen kurzen Moment die Hände vom Lenkrad zu nehmen. Die Straße lief einfach nur immer geradeaus und die seltenen Gelegenheiten wenn mal ein anderes Auto vorbeikam waren der Gipfel der Aufregung auf diesem langweiligsten und einschläferndsten Stück Straße, das ich jemals das Missvergnügen hatte befahren zu müssen.

Irgendwie schafften wir es trotzdem nach Helena und waren etwas erstaunt, dass wir den Ort direkt mochten. Er ist gar nicht mal so klein, aber wirkte wie eine Geisterstadt, denn die Straßen waren quasi leer. Es war zwar gerade Wochenende, aber wo waren die ganzen Leute hin? Selbst in der Innenstadt waren die Bürgersteige leer gefegt und Janina entschied spontan, dass Helena ihre neue Lieblingsstadt wäre, da sie ganz hübsch und so absolut ruhig war. Es ist aber eine der größeren Städte in Montana und davon gibt es dort nicht so viele. Der einzige Übernachtungsplatz, den wir dort fanden war der örtliche Walmarkt-Parkplatz. Als wir dort ankamen waren wir ziemlich schockiert von der Tatsache, dass er direkt gegenüber von einer großen Raffinerie liegt. In der ganzen Gegend stank es unentwegt nach heißem Teer und wir dachten uns, dass das nicht allzu gesund sein könne. Wir blieben trotzdem dort denn am nächsten Morgen wollten wir uns noch das Lewis & Clark Zentrum ansehen, zu dem unser Interagency Pass uns freien Eintritt gewährte. Wer noch nie von den beiden Herren gehört hat – Meriwether Lewis und William Clark wurden im Jahre 1803 vom ehemaligen Präsidenten Thomas Jefferson damit beauftragt den Westen der USA zu erforschen. Das war kurz nachdem man Napoleon den Staat Louisiana abgekauft hatte und der Westen der heutigen USA war quasi unbekanntes Land. Lewis und Clark sollten daher eine Route durch den Westen finden, das Gebiet kartographieren und zudem den Anspruch der USA sichern bevor die Engländer oder andere Europäer auftauchen konnten um es sich unter den Nagel zu reißen. Außerdem sollten sie Pflanzen und Tiere studieren und Handelsbeziehungen zu Indianerstämmen aufnehmen. Ihre Reise sollte mehr als zwei Jahre dauern und wurde zu einem Teil der amerikanischen Geschichte. Nicht weniger bekannt wurde Sacagawea, eine Angehöirge des Stammes der Shoshonen, die zusammen mit ihrem Mann und neugeborenen Kind die Expedition begleitete. Das Informationszentrum, das die Geschichte dieser amerikanischen Pioniere schildert, ist sehr informativ und unterhaltsam aufgemacht, ebenso wie wir es von ähnlichen Einrichtungen der Nationalparks etc. bereits gewohnt waren.

Nach diesem kurzen Ausflug in die amerikanische Geschichte, suchten wir mal wieder einen Starbucks auf, den dort findet man immer noch das schnellste Internet. Als wir unseren Blog aktualisiert und ein paar Anrufe nach Hause getätigt hatten, wollten wir Helena wieder verlassen. Ich fuhr rückwärts aus der Parklücke vor dem Starbucks und scherzte wie etliche Male zuvor mit Janina herum, dass wir in irgendetwas reinbrettern würden. Mit dem Camper auf der Ladefläche sieht man nämlich nach hinten nicht wirklich viel in unserem Auto, selbst mit den zusätzlichen Spiegeln, die wir haben. Wie immer fuhr ich also einfach sehr langsam und vorsichtig rückwärts in der Hoffnung, dass jedermann hinter uns einfach warten würde; das scheint in den USA allgemein das Regelverhalten für rückwärts ausparken zu sein. Plötzlich hörten wir Glas klirren und ein garstiges Knirschen und wussten, dass es dieses Mal schiefgegangen war. Ein anderes Auto hatte hinter uns gleichzeitig in die entgegengesetzte Richtung ausgeparkt und das Unvermeidliche war geschehen – wir stießen zusammen. Ich stieg aus um nachzusehen wie schlimm es war und bemerkte sofort, dass die Heckscheibe des anderen Autos geplatzt war. An unserem Truck entdeckte ich allerdings keinerlei Schäden und am Camper war nur eine kleine Klappe etwas nach hinten gebogen. Die arme Frau im anderen Auto war noch viel geschockter als wir es waren und nachdem wir unsere Versicherungsinformationen ausgetauscht hatten, kam ihr Mann dazu. Wie sich herausstellte, lebte sein Sohn zufälligerweise in Deutschland, aber es hatte niemand von uns die Nerven an diesem Zufall irgendein Interesse zu zeigen. Wir haben bei dem Unfall Schwein gehabt, da wir ja ohne Schaden davongekommen waren. Die verbogene Klappe konnte ich direkt wieder korrigieren und das war’s auch schon. Natürlich haben wir unsere Versicherung in Kenntnis gesetzt, aber man sagte uns, dass sie eigentlich nur abwarten würden ob die Frau im anderen Auto sich melden würde. Falls nicht, würden sie auch nichts weiter unternehmen. Bisher haben wir nichts mehr von ihnen gehört. Wir hatten übrigens auch direkt die Polizei angerufen, aber da der Unfall auf Privatgelände stattfand, kamen sie gar nicht erst

Wir verließen Helena schließlich und fuhren weiter zur nächsten größeren Stadt, Great Falls. Dort wollten wir nun endlich unsere Einkäufe erledigen um einige Tage im Yellowstone Park wandern zu können. Wir verbachten sogar zwei Nächte in Great Flls, zunächst auf einem billigen staatlichen Campingpltz, der nachts voll mit Rehen war und anschließend im nahegelegenen Staatsforst. Wir kauften jede Menge Tütenfraß ein, den man schnell aufwärmen kann und waren somit für unsere Wanderung gerüstet. Unser Basislager sollte für den Anfang der kleine Ort West Yellowstone werden.

West Yellowstone scheint vollkommen auf den Nationalpark-Tourismus ausgerichtet zu sein und wirkt irgendwie recht künstlich. Wir besuchten dort das Infozentrum des Parks, hatten aber am Nachmittag kein Glück mehr damit eine Wandererlaubnis fürs Hinterland zu bekommen und mussten somit am nächsten Tag noch einmal wiederkommen. Am darauf folgenden Morgen trafen wir dann einen sehr netten, älteren Freiwilligen an, der uns unsere Erlaubnis verschaffen konnte. Wir mussten uns zuvor aber noch ein knapp 20-minütiges Video ansehen, in dem einem erklärt wird wie man sich im Hinterland zu verhalten hat. Das war zwar alles nichts Neues für uns, aber natürlich müssen die Parks auf Nummer sicher gehen. Zusammen mit uns sahen sich noch ein gutes Dutzend Studenten der Georgetown Universität das Video an, von denen sich einer sogar als Deutscher entpuppte. Wir hatten uns zuvor keine betimmte Gegend des Parks für unsere Wanderung ausgesucht und wollten einfach sehen war wir noch kriegen konnten. So ergab sich dann für uns eine Wanderung mit vier Übernachtungen durch das Firehole Gebiet nahe des Old Faithful.

Da unsere Wanderung aber erst in zwei Tagen losgehen konnte, hatten wir etwas Zeit totzuschlagen und nutzten diese um uns einige der Gegenden des Parks anzusehen, in denen es Thermalquellen, Geysire und Fumarolen gibt. Natürlich besichtigten wir auch den wahrscheinlich bekanntesten Geysir der Welt – Old Faithful. Direkt nebenan bestaunten wir außerdem die einzigartige Holzkonstruktion des Old Faithful Inn.

Zwei besondere Termine standen direkt vor der Haustür als wir in uns in Yellowstone aufhielten – zum Einen die Nacht des Perseiden-Meteoritenschauers und zum Anderen unser Hochzeitstag. Zufälligerweise liegt beides genau auf demselben Datum, was mir bisher nie aufgefallen war. Seit mittlerweile gut 20 Jahren wollte ich immer mal den Meteoritenschauer beobachten, aber irgendwie hat es nie geklappt. In manchen Jahren hatte ich schlicht nicht an das Datum gedacht, in anderen Jahren war ich anderweitig beschäftigt und in vielen Jahren vereitelten Wolken und schlechtes Wetter jeden Beobachtungsversuch. Dieses Jahr hatten wir die Hoffnung die Erfahrung miteinander teilen zu können und unseren Hochzeitstag somit sogar noch ein bisschen besonderer zu machen. Nur, dass das Wetter leider wieder nicht so wirklich mitspielen wollte als gegen Abend eine Wolkendecke aufzog. Später in der Nacht verzog sich diese allerdings dann wieder und wir konnten endlich nach Meteoriten Ausschau halten. Tatsächlich sahen wir auch so manche Sternschnuppe, obwohl ihre Anzahl weit hinter dem zurückblieb was wir uns vorgestellt hatten. Gleich zu Anfang hatten wir aber Glück und sahen eine besonders lange und sehr helle Sternschnuppe über den Himmel zischen und soweit Janina sich erinnern konnte war das sogar die erste, die sie je gesehen hatte. Ich versuchte das Ereignis mit unserer Kamera einzufangen, aber nach Dutzenden von Bildern hatte ich keinen wirklichen Erfolg erzielt und gab schließlich auf.

Schließlich war der Aufbruchstag unserer Wanderung durchs Hinterland von Yellowstone gekommen und gegen Mittag zogen wir los. Wir konnten uns Zeit lassen, da für den ersten Abschnitt keine besonders lange Strecke geplant war. Während wir an Thermalquellen vorbeispazierten und dem Pfad folgten, spähte ich die ganze Zeit rundherum auf der Suche nach Bisons. Ich wollte sehr gern welche sehen und soweit Janina sich von ihrem ersten Besuch erinnerte, sollten sie eigentlich überall herumlaufen. Nach ein paar Stunden Wanderung sahen wir dann auch endlich eins, das allein im Gras lag und sich ausruhte. An dem Tag kamen wir auch an einigen heißen Quellen vorbei und genossen es, dass dort keine Zäune den Zugang versperrten und wir ganz nah herangehen konnten. Einige der Quellen wirkten ziemlich einladend und wir waren beinahe versucht uns ein heißes Bad zu gönnen, aber so etwas ist generell verboten. Das ist wohl auch besser so, denn in der Regel sind die Quellen kochend heiß und ihr Wasser kann außerdem ätzend sein. Als wir an unserem ersten zugewiesenen Campingort ankamen waren wir nicht besonders angetan. Er lag mitten auf einer relativ kahlen Ebene und der kleine Bach, der unsere Wasserversorgung sichern sollte, lief durch eine große, sumpfige Wiese. Immerhin hatten wir den Ort ganz für uns allein und waren draußen in der Natur. Des Nachts hörten wir Koyoten irgendwo in der Dunkelheit heulen, aber sahen leider keine. Die Nacht stellte sich als ziemlich kalt heraus und als wir am nächsten Morgen aus dem Zelt krochen war alles um uns herum mit glitzerndem Frost bedeckt. Wir hatten den freiwilligen Helfer, der uns unsere Wandererlaubnis ausgestellt hatte, extra danach gefragt ob es vielleicht um den Gefrierpunkt kalt werden könnte, aber er hatte das verneint, was sich somit als Fehlinformation herausstellte.

Wir setzten unsere Wanderung fort und ließen den Fairy Creek Pfad hinter uns. Das bedeutete auch, dass wir auf einmal völlig allein waren. Nach etwas über 10 km kamen wir bereits an unserem zweiten Übernachtungsplatz an, der schon besser aussah. Er lag auf einem kleinen Hügel am Waldrand und von dort aus konnten wir über eine große,, grasbewachsene Ebene blicken. Wir stellten unser Zelt gute 100 Meter entfernt vom Lagerfeuerplatz auf, denn für die Gegend gab es eine doppelte Bärenwarnung. Andere Wanderer hatten zwei Grizzlys beobachtet, die in der Nähe der Campingstelle heurmhingen, also mussten wir noch etwas vorsichtiger als üblich sein. Eine knappe Woche bevor wir in Yellowstone ankamen war ein Mann innerhalb des Nationalparks von einem Grizzly getötet und teilweise aufgefressen worden. Das geschah allerdings in einer ganz anderen Ecke des Parks und wir brauchten nichts zu befürchten. Das Opfer hatte seit einigen Jahren in der Gegend gelebt und war mit der Zeit wohl unvorsichtig geworden. Er war allein wandern gewesen und hatte kein Bärenspray bei sich. Mittlerweile hatten wir genug Erfahrung damit wie man sich in einer Gegend zu verhalten hat, in der es Bären gibt, bzw. den Tieren selbst gegenüber. Wenn man diese einfachen paar Regeln kennt, sind Bären überhaupt nicht gefährlich, auch wenn die zahlreichen Warnschilder innerhalb des Parks das etwas anders darstellten. Das war allerdings sogar etwas lächerlich! Es gab Warnschilder, die einem sagten, dass Bisons extrem gefährlich seien und so ziemlich jedes andere wilde Tier ebenfalls. Wir hatten gelernt, dass im Grunde kein Tier gefährlich ist, so lange man es nicht ängstigt. Die Warnschilder in den kanadischen Nationalparks schlugen ebenfalls einen ganz anderen Ton an. Sie erklärten einem lediglich, dass es nun mal wilde Tiere sind, die sich bedroht oder ängstlich fühlen können wenn man ihnen zu nahe kommt oder sich ihnen gegenüber idiotisch verhält. Es ist wirklich nicht schwer oder aufwändig zu lernen wie man sich ihnen gegenüber benehmen sollte und auf die Art passiert einem gar nichts und den Tieren auch nicht. Naja, jedenfalls gab es die Bärenwarnung für unser zweites Camp und daher rechneten wir uns gute Chancen aus Grizzlys zu Gesicht zu bekommen, aber zu unserem Bedauern fanden wir nicht einmal Spuren von ihnen während der zwei Tage, die wir dort blieben.

Tagsüber war es sehr windig gewesen und wir hatten ein bisschen Sorge wegen unseres Campers. Der Kühlschrank darin läuft mit Propangas und bei starkem Wind kann die Flamme ausgepustet werden, wodurch das ganze Essen darin verderben würde. Gegen Abend legte der Wind sich aber und wir konnten es uns an einem schönen Lagerfeuer gemütlich machen bevor wir uns auf eine weitere kalte Nacht vorbereiteten. Es sollte die erste von zweien an diesem Campingplatz werden, also erkundeten wir am folgenden Tag nur die nähere Umgebung. Unsere Karte zeigte einen Ort namens “Büffel-Wiesen” und da kein Wanderweg dorthin führte, schlugen wir uns querfeldein. Wir dachten, dass der Name vielleicht bedeuten würde, dass wir dort Bisons finden könnten, aber auch dort sahen wir wieder nichts anderes als die allgegenwärtigen Hirsche.

Die zweite Nacht bei Firehole Meadows wurde sogar noch kälter als die vorherigen und als wir morgens aufstanden, war wieder alles draußen mit Frost überzogen und in unseren Wasserflaschen schwammen Eisstückchen. Wir waren auf solche Temperaturen nur bedingt vorbereitet, denn wir hatten nur unsere beiden dünnen Sommer-Schlafsäcke, die schon seit Costa Rica zum Einsatz gekommen waren, sowie einen dicken, der für niedrige Temperaturen gedacht war. Die dünnen Schlafsäcke hatten wir zu einem großen zusammengefügt und uns darin mit dem dicken Schlafsack zugedeckt. So konnte man die Nächte überstehen, aber besonders gemütlich war es trotzdem nicht. Am Vorabend hatte ich eine Menge Feuerholz herangeschleppt und so konnten wir uns ein großes Lagerfeuer zum Frühstück gönnen und uns daran aufwärmen. Ohne das Feuer wäre es ein wirklich garstiger Morgen geworden. Es wurde aber besser als wir losgelaufen waren um die längste Strecke unserer Wanderung an dem Tag zu überwinden. Wir wandten uns gen Osten und wussten daher, dass wir nach ein paar Meilen wieder in die touristengefüllten Gebiete zirückkkehren müssten. Während wir zugig durch die Wälder wanderten war uns warm genug, aber das Wetter an sich war eher schlecht. Es blieb den ganzen Tag über bewölkt, windig und ziemlich kühl. Gegen Mittag beschlossen wir auf die letzte Übernachtung zu verzichten. Am letzten Campingort, den wir bekommen hatten, waren keine Lagerfeuer erlaubt und bei der unerwartet kalten Witterung wäre es nicht sehr spaßig geworden dort zu übernachten. Der Ort lag sowieso nur ein paar Meilen von dem Wanderparkplatz entfernt, auf dem unser Camper stand. Wir warfen unseren Plan also über den Haufen und liefen die gesamte Strecke zurück zum Auto an einem Tag, was auf knapp 18 km kam. Auf dem Weg kamen wir auch durch ein paar der beliebteren Gegenden mit heißen Quellen, Geysiren etc. und wir liefen zwischen den vielen Touristen herum, die gekommen waren sie sich anzusehen, da man sie bequem mit dem Auto erreichen kann.

Nur ein paar Hundert Meter bevor wir wieder an unserem Camper angekommen waren, stießen wir auf eine kleinere Bisonherde. Endlich bekamen wir ein paar dieser Tiere zu Gesicht und das sogar von ziemlich nah. Als wir danach am Auto angelangt waren, stellten wir fest, dass der Kühlschrank tatsächlich irgendwann früher am Tag ausgegangen war und wir Glück hatten früher zurückzukommen als geplant. Wir freuten uns außerdem auf unsere kleine Heizung im Camper und darauf etwas anderes als Tütenfraß zu essen zu haben, denn den kann man sogar nach ein paar kurzen Tagen schnell satt haben. Für die Nacht verließen wir den Park dann wieder und auf dem Weg zurück nach West Yellowstone begegneten wir einem weiteren Bison. Es lief in aller Seelenruhe mitten auf der Straße herum und verursachte so einen kleineren Stau.

Wir hatten unsere Wanderung durchs Hinterland des Yellowstone Parks genossen, auch wenn sie sich nicht mit Wanderungen in wirklich abgelegenen Gegenden vergleichen lässt. Dennoch, es war uns gelungen den Touristenströmen für eine Weile zu entfliehen. Es gefiel un außerdem, dass die Wandererlaubnis im Yellowstone Park sehr günstig zu haben waren (3 Dollar pro Nase pro Nacht bis maximal 15 Dollar insgesamt) und dass man die zugewiesenen Campingorte ganz für sich allein hat. Einen Platz auf den normalen Campingplätzen innerhalb des Parks zu finden stellte sich als ungleich problematischer heras, wie wir am Tag herausfanden nachdem wir zurückgekommen waren. Die meisten Plätze füllen sich schon früh am Tage und somit mussten wir den Park für eine weitere Nacht verlassen. Dieses Mal fuhren wir durch den Nordosteingang hinaus und fanden einen National Forest Service Campingplatz. Es war einer von ein paar in der Nähe des Parks auf denen keine Zelte erlaubt sind, da Grizzlys dort desöfteren vorbeispazieren. Ein anderer Camper dort erzählte uns davon wie ein Fahrradfahrer im Vorjahr verbotenerweise dort im Zelt genächtigt hatte während der Campingplatz in der Nebensaison geschlossen war. Ein Bär kam in sein Zelt und hat ihn getötet. Man muss dazu sagen, dass so etwas extrem selten vorkommt und dann in der Regel auch nur wenn jemand etwas wirllich dämliches tut wie z.B. Nahrung im Zelt aufzubewahren. Der Vorfall schien aber die lokalen Campingplatz-Wärter gehörig schockiert zu haben, denn eine ältere Dame patrouillierte abends mit einem Stock in der Hand und überprüfte ob auch jeder Camper sein Essen ordnungsgemäß in die bereitgestellten bärensicheren Container gepackt hatte. In der anderen Hand hatte sie außerdem eine Dose Bärenspray im Anschlag was uns etwas zum Grinsen brachte. Andererseits ist es eigentlich nicht wirklich amüsant, dass selbst in und um Nationalparks herum Menschen mit blödsinnigen Wanrschilder über die Natur und Tierwelt verrückt gemacht werden, denn es gibt eigentlich keinen Grund dafür und führt letzten Endes nur dazu, dass die Leute noch mehr von der Natur entfremdet werden, als sie es ohnehin schon sind.

Am nächsten Tag fuhren wir wieder zurück in den Park und sicherten uns bereits morgens einen Platz auf dem Tower Falls Campingplatz. Danach fuhren wir in Richtung “Grand Canyon von Yellowstone”, aber aus irgendeinem Grund war es in den letzten Tagen bereits sehr diesig gewesen und geblieben, also sahen wir uns lieber noch ein paar Ecken mit geothermaler Aktivität an und besuchten den Nordwestteil des Parks. Nachdem man eine Handvoll heißer Quellen, Geysire und blubbernder Teiche gesehen hat, fängt das Ganze sich aber schnell zu wiederholen an und die Highlights hatten wir bereits abgeklappert. Der Tower Falls Campingplatz war proppenvoll und nicht sehr schön, aber wir mussten es dort nicht lange aushalten denn wir hatten vor am nächsten Morgen sehr sehr früh aufzustehen. Unser Plan war noch bei Dunkelheit ins Lamar Tal zu fahren in der Hoffnung dort Wölfe und Koyoten beobachten zu können. Die Gegend wurde dafür als am vielversprechendsten geführt und wir schafften es zeitig dort zu sein und uns einen guten Platz zu suchen von dem aus wir das Tal überblicken konnten. Anschließend packten wir unser Fernglas aus, aber unsere Bemühungen sollten nicht von Erfolg gekrönt werden. Wir hörten zwar wieder Koyoten, aber sehen konnten wir sie nirgends. Das einzige, das wir von den Wölfen zu Gesicht bekamen, sollte der eine Tatzenabdruck bleiben, den wir beim wandern entdeckt hatten. Zumindest gab es aber wieder Unmengen von Bisons im Tal und wie bereits am Vortag als wir dort vorbeigekommen waren, konnten wir ganz nahe an sie heran. Danach fuhren wir dann doch noch zum Yellowstone Canyon, der sich als wirklich schön herausstellte mit all den verschiedenfarbigen Gesteinsschichten und heißen Quellen tief unten in der Schlucht. Alles in allem hatten wir es geschafft uns relativ viel vom Yellowstone Park anzuschauen und waren bereit weiterzuziehen. Wir fuhren in Richtung Osten, denn unser nächster Stopp sollte das Städtchen Cody werden, das von der Wildwest-Legende Buffalo Bill gegründet worden war.